Heir to the Empire City

Heir to the Empire City

New York and the Making of Theodore Roosevelt

Book - 2014
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Baker & Taylor
"Theodore Roosevelt is best remembered as America's prototypical "cowboy" president-a Rough Rider who derived his political wisdom from a youth spent in the untamed American West. But while the great outdoors certainly shaped Roosevelt's identity, historian Edward P. Kohn argues that it was his hometown of New York that made him the progressive president we celebrate today. During his early political career, Roosevelt took on local Republican factions and Tammany Hall Democrats alike, proving his commitment to reform at all costs. He combated the city's rampant corruption, and helped to guide New York through the perils of rabid urbanization and the challenges of accommodating an influx of immigrants-experiences that would serve him well as president ofthe United States. A riveting account of a man and a city on the brink of greatness, Heir to the Empire City reveals that Roosevelt's true education took place not in the West but on the mean streets of nineteenth-century New York. "--

Perseus Publishing
Theodore Roosevelt is best remembered as America's prototypical "cowboy" president-a Rough Rider who derived his political wisdom from a youth spent in the untamed American West. But while the great outdoors certainly shaped Roosevelt's identity, historian Edward P. Kohn argues that it was his hometown of New York that made him the progressive president we celebrate today. During his early political career, Roosevelt took on local Republican factions and Tammany Hall Democrats alike, proving his commitment to reform at all costs. He combated the city's rampant corruption, and helped to guide New York through the perils of rabid urbanization and the challenges of accommodating an influx of immigrants-experiences that would serve him well as president of the United States.

A riveting account of a man and a city on the brink of greatness, Heir to the Empire City reveals that Roosevelt's true education took place not in the West but on the mean streets of nineteenth-century New York.


Book News
Kohn places Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Rider and cowboy image in the back seat as he delineates the making of the urbanite, progressive, city born and bred man who became our 26th President and a Nobel Peace Prize winner. He locates the genesis of TR's love of nature in the backyards of New York, where he collected mice and frogs and practiced taxidermy as a child. His early political career also began in New York, not the West, as he served as a New York State Assembly representative for his uptown district, fought Tammany Hall, and honed his progressive agenda. The author cites the West as the place where he recouped from loss and rejection, and built his cowboy image. In 11 chapters, Kohn elucidates the influence New York had on Teddy, as well as the influence Teddy had on New York. There is a bibliography. Annotation ©2014 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Argues that Theodore Roosevelt's true education took place not in the West but on the mean streets of 19th-century New York City.
Argues that Theodore Roosevelt's true education took place not in the West but on the mean streets of nineteenth-century New York City.

Publisher: New York : Basic Books, [2014]
ISBN: 9780465024292
0465024297
Branch Call Number: Biography R6775k
Characteristics: xv, 256 pages : illustration ; 25 cm

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26th President 1901–1909


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